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Greatest rappers of all time 2019

List of 2000s hip hop songs

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John Entwistle almost didn’t make this list, by virtue of being, well, too good. There are so many great Who songs to choose from, but one melody that tends to stick in my head is the pentatonic major run heard behind the “I tip my hat” refrain in this song. The riff starts at the relative minor and runs down to the root, hitting all five notes of the scale. It’s a simple sequence, but I’ve noticed that scalar walk-downs to the root pretty much always sound good on the bass. (For example, check out the choruses of the Beatles’ “Helter Skelter” and Kiss’ “Shout It Out Loud”). Entwistle repeats this motif several times throughout the chorus with slight variations that keep it continually compelling.

Thinking about what’s in it for the venue can also help you learn how to better sell your band in other marketing arenas. For example, if you’re angling to land a show opening for a bigger band touring through your town, the economy of that inquiry is pretty much in favor of the venue, the band, and their management. If you’re lucky and experiencing some real momentum, maybe you’ll get asked to join the bill, but otherwise, it’s important to know what cards you hold in your hand, and which to play.

Full ride scholarships

Content-makers often inquire about my services or how they can create a podcast themselves. Most podcasts, however, tend to be personal passion projects and ultimately don’t have the budget for a professional studio to record and edit each episode. So hosts or producers will turn to YouTube, friends, and family to educate them on how to create their content, and this is where a lot of people struggle. Let’s dig in.

A great example of this is in Maurice Ravel’s String Quartet in F Major, right at the beginning of the second movement (which starts at 7:41 in the below video). In the second measure, the second violin and viola continue their eighth-note pattern grouped in threes, while the first violin plays descending quarter notes, essentially groups of two eighth notes.

This is one of my favorite tucked-away towns in the country. After stopping here on my way between Seattle and Vancouver, it’s easy to see why this would be a must-stop for touring musicians of all kinds. Although you might think its quaintness works against it, small-town Washington state has long harbored thriving bastions of DIY creativity since the 1970s. With a few local independent labels and a local music publication called What’s Up! Magazine, this tiny town is worth visiting, to make some great connections and play for an awesome crowd! Bonus trivia: It’s where Death Cab for Cutie originated from.

Adopting digital tools and technologies in the classroom can pose a risk for a student’s education that is tied in with social and emotional interaction and adaptation, peer-to-peer feedback (both verbal and non-verbal), and close-touch collaboration. But it can also encourage habit forming, haptics sensitivity, and muscle memory building, etc. As a somewhat heavy introduction to the lengthy conversation to follow, this topic references a lot of what’s being talked about in educational circles right now, and much of it gets fleshed out later. For now, let’s just consider that while digital tools are definitely assets in the classroom for a number of reasons, they may fall short or, at worse, cause harm to a student’s education when they approach minimizing or eliminating the teacher and their role. 

Soundfly welcomes new voices each month to offer unique perspectives, shine a light on unexpected musical worlds, and help our readers find their sound.

Inspire giving

“I have a fictitious person I write for. And she’s called Doris, and she’s from Bradford and she wears a raincoat and she has two horrible little kids that are giving her nothing but grief. And you know, the man left her a while back. And she just, in the rain, everyday, trudges to work and she works hard.”

The great thing about studying pop tunes is that they very rarely stray from a given key. They like to keep things rather diatonic. This means that with just a small bit of practice, you can start to recognize these chord progressions for yourself, even without your instrument in hand. We will go much deeper into our understanding of how these chords function in later articles, but for now let’s just get comfortable with what we get from “Sorry.”

With overwhelmingly positive results, we’re happy to share a few testimonials of Soundfly’s Orchestration For Strings course directly from our students.

At the same time, it’s pretty easy to dismiss this idea of using old video game sound chips to cover well-known tunes as just some kind of novelty gimmick.

Charlotte Yates is an independent New Zealand singer-songwriter with a growing catalogue of seven solo releases and thirteen collaborative projects. She also composes music for TV, theatre and short film, and provides a songwriting coaching service, Songdoctor.